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PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2006 1:20 pm 
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Location: Statesville NC
I too think that it is important to have a common knowledge of what to do and how to react if it becomes necessary. However don’t let this get in the way of having a good time. If you spend every second worrying about what if you will never relax and have a good time.
As a health care worker in and Urgent Care facility, we have to be able to react when the time comes, but I don’t spend my days worrying about what may come.
When we bought our first ATV I asked the physicians that I work for if there was something extra that I needed to know. They said that even just a common knowledge of first aid would be enough while someone else goes for help. How far you want to take this care is up to you. I think that as long as you know basic CPR and first aid you should be just fine.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 16, 2006 4:54 pm 
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basic CPR and Basic First Aid don't teach resourcefulness. They teach you how to splint as in if its broke put something on it to immobilize it. The most important thing that everyone has to understand that when an emergency does become a factor, do you have the basic know how to deal with what you have in front of you.

I would sure hope that you don't spend every waking minute while riding running this stuff through your head, because I sure don't!!! A first aid class is great, but IMO not enough if you want to seriously make a difference.


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PostPosted: Fri Nov 17, 2006 7:08 am 
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Resourcefulness is something that you get by dealing with experiences, such as a serious accident...most average every day people will not know how they are going to react until they are put into that type of situation. With that being said a CPR/First Aid class is about the only thing that people who don't work in health care can do. Unless they are fortunate enough to know someone such as your self who can teach them more. Hey now there's and idea why don't you offer some type of free class to 4wheeler enthusiast in your location. :wink:
However you are right everyone does need to have a common knowledge of how to handle a situation when and if it arrives.


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PostPosted: Thu Nov 23, 2006 10:46 pm 
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I find this thread refreshing. I have spent all of my adult life as an EMT, or advanced EMT. I have 44 months of Combat with the USMC as a Naval Corpsman. I hear a number of the correct things to carry as a responder.

CPR Classes at your closest Red Cross.

IMO you only need the most basics of training. If you have an Emergency Room in a local hospital, Many ER's will allow you to audit or volunteer the goings on. We open the doors to locals who are sincerely interested in learning the 'whys and wherefors of trauma work'. More than auditing what is going on, might change your mind to a vocation.

Oh, yeah what they said about the equipment to carry as a novice responder. You need to add a couple of small Hemostats just in case of severe bleeding, pumping blood should be clamped


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PostPosted: Sat Nov 25, 2006 11:34 am 
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fier231 wrote:
Hate to burst the big bubble here. But usually if someone goes down and quits breathing due to a tramatic event, There is an underlying problem and CPR will not be the miracle. My partner and I both ride and are both medics for over 13yrs. I don't have all the answers but what I do know that CPR works MAYBE 5-10% of the time. Yes it is good to know, But what is even better to know is how far your closest hospital and ems workers are, The emergency #'s, and where you are at and the fastest way to get out. Most of all ride within you own limits. Just my .02


Everyone in this thread has said some things that rang true when my brother had his accident in September. fier231's post said it best in our case. His last 2 sentences said the most (But what is even better to know is how far your closest hospital and ems workers are, The emergency #'s, and where you are at and the fastest way to get out.). I have acquired the 911 tape of that day on the mountain. There were 2 calls made to 911. A couple with a jeep and my younger brother made calls. One thing stood out very much in both calls. That was trying to explain exactly where we were. After several attempts to make our positions, both of the calls had someone with GPS. They (and I) didn't even think of the GPS until about 5 min into the calls. "Know where you are" is one of the best things you can relay to those who want to get to you fast. In our case, fier231's 2nd sentence (But usually if someone goes down and quits breathing due to a tramatic event, There is an underlying problem and CPR will not be the miracle.) said it all.


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PostPosted: Sat Dec 09, 2006 1:12 pm 
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i like to bring the life flight with me personally when i go out ridin


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 10, 2006 6:54 pm 
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Location: Long Branch, NJ/New Concord, KY
Safety first always! Have a check list before you disappear and find yourself miles into the woods on rough terrain and whatever.

Basic classes ofr First Aid, is a good thing, if not least use your common sense. Don't abuse the 4-wheeler, don't be a speed demon, be aware of your surroundings-to avoid a situation where it is a risk.

I'm certified in First Aid, and have my heart saver card I got as proof. I was forced to take the class by the OEM I volunteer with. ANd I'm glad I know what to do at the right time, and how to handle it without panicking.
Also don't ride alone is smart and have that helmet on, whether you think your a safe rider or not. Thats my 2 cents


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PostPosted: Sun Dec 10, 2006 7:00 pm 
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Rincon_Rebel wrote:
basic CPR and Basic First Aid don't teach resourcefulness. They teach you how to splint as in if its broke put something on it to immobilize it. The most important thing that everyone has to understand that when an emergency does become a factor, do you have the basic know how to deal with what you have in front of you.

I would sure hope that you don't spend every waking minute while riding running this stuff through your head, because I sure don't!!! A first aid class is great, but IMO not enough if you want to seriously make a difference.


First Aid is just how to take care of a situation, you are right on that, but how to handle a situation by making the right choices-quickly -and handling whats going on around you can cause some mental deals...Is that what you are talking about? Thats why after a situation and you feel in shock from what happened to someone you were caring for you talk to a doctor, or someone in the medical field.

They have classes-like there's Triage...thats one I know, there's other classes out there that can help you handle that stress on you, you may have on your shoulders when the time comes and you need to keep your cool.


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PostPosted: Tue Feb 06, 2007 6:01 pm 
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JoeCapo wrote:

They have classes-like there's Triage...thats one I know, there's other classes out there that can help you handle that stress on you, you may have on your shoulders when the time comes and you need to keep your cool.


Triage is a good way of putting it. When you go to the hospital you are greeted by a nurse and then assessed, she is the triage nurse. They do your initial assessing and can narrow down the next corrective path towards treatment. What i was trying to get across to all of you is that there really isn't anything that is going to prepare you for the mental stress/ shock that happens in a traumatic situation where you have to take charge, unless you have dealt with critical situations like that in the past or have certain trainings to help you make decisions under pressure.


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PostPosted: Wed Mar 07, 2007 3:48 pm 
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I've been a first responder for the last 12 years (also drove ambulance for a few years along the way), and assistant chief/chief of a small town rural volunteer fire department for the past 10 years. I also run a fire engine that I contract with the forest service in the summer on large fires nation wide. One of the biggest problems we have here is our 911 dispatch office is located 40 miles away so they aren't familiar wit hthe fire roads/trails in our area. PEople cal 911 knowing exactly where they are, but 911 has troubles translating that information to us, so usually it's "off such and such road around the 5 to 10 mile marker". I would highly recommend anybody that's out trailriding carry a cell phone and a GPS and learn how to use it correctly. Find out if the local fire department has GPS's and if so find out what datum system they are using on their units. Coordinates given using one datum system, may be located 1/2 mile away according to a different datum system. If the local fire departments don't use GPS, the nearest FS (usually involved in search and rescue on fed land) or state forestry offices most likely do. Fed Forest Service usually uses the WGS84 system or NAD 27 CONUS. Having cell service, and being able to give a good GPS location could be a true lifesaver when time is a critical issue. Another thing for people that live way out in the country would be to look for large level open fields (out west we've all seen them in the middle of nowhere)that may be a safe place to land a Airlife helicopter. If an ambulance is going to take an hour to get to where you are because of rough roads or limited access, you could be looking at 2 - 2 1/2 hours off road, before ever even beginning the road trip to the hospital (another 45 minutes in my area), Airlife may be able to cut the total time from call to arriving at the hospital down to 1 - 1 1/2 hour, so possible helicopter landing sites are important to think about too. Most Air ambulances I've dealt with along with helicopters flying large fires are all using the NAD 27 CONUS datum also.


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